Friday Fictioneers for 8/28/2020 (Big Bend Kill Me, Save Me)

Thanks to Rochelle @ Rochelle Wisoff-Fields-Addicted to Purple for another Friday Fictioneers inspirational photo, promulgated on Wednesday. Her weekly challenge is to write a story of 100 words or less based on the photo prompt, provided this week by J Hardy Carroll.

Photo prompt provided by J Hardy Carroll (photo credit)

 


Title: Big Bend Kill Me, Save Me
Genre: Fiction (Texas Outdoors)
Word Count: 100

I was lost at night in the Chihuahuan Desert of southwest Texas. Thunderstorms flooded arroyos with torrents leading to the Rio Grande. Without overnight gear, rain soaked me. I couldn’t see as storms raged and lightning flashed.

A bolt struck near me. I felt an electrical burn run through my body. I was going to die. A nearby cactus caught fire and burned despite the rain. I crawled under a rock outcropping.

Park Rangers rescued me in the morning. Someone had seen my signal. I asked, What signal? They said, a tall pillar of yellow light pointed the way. Strange.

Rising 8,085 feet out of the Chihuahuan Desert, El Capitan is the most well known Texas peak.

Look both ways and carry the ten essentials of survival.
Mind the  gaps for flash floods.

Click for link to other stories.

44 thoughts on “Friday Fictioneers for 8/28/2020 (Big Bend Kill Me, Save Me)

    1. Thank you, Sue. While it is fiction, there is some truthful portions. I have been dumb enough to be out in the wilds at night without the essentials of survival. Once was enough.

      Liked by 3 people

      1. Yep, learned that lesson myself once. Fortunately, I was with a Boy Scout who guided us out with a pen light. Three miles through the rain forest in the dark of night😳

        Liked by 1 person

  1. I love to go out and stand in the summer rain. I do it in my backyard where it’s almost safe. Two weeks ago today, lightning struck a few miles from here and started a big fire. Today’s the first day we’re not inundated with smoke in almost two weeks. It’s always fascinated me that fires can start in a downpour.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’d like to see this as simply magical. I suppose, though, there’s a more mundane explanation having to do with the cactus deflecting some of the power of the lightning, In either case, a really good story.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. If you’ve ever seen cactus burn at night, it is an eerie sight. Because it is mostly moisture on the inside, it resits combustion. But it will burn.
      I am not sure what would deflect lightning. I just know that I don’t like it around me when I am out and about. 🙂 Thanks for comment, Linda.

      Liked by 1 person

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